How Pablo Picasso Transformed 20th-Century Art

How Pablo Picasso Transformed 20th-Century Art


I think it’s fair to say there’s art
before Picasso, there is art after Picasso and it is not the same, it’s completely transformed. The Spanish are a wonderful culture and they have an interesting concept called the “Duende” and the Duende is sort of like a
benevolent demon that visits upon certain people and gifts them with an
amazing artistic genius and Picasso really believed that he had the Duende, and in many cases he would create a work of art and sit back and contemplate that
work of art and not even know how he created it. It’s one reason why he didn’t
talk a lot about his work and about his creative process because he was as amazed as was everyone else when looking at his work and imagining how he created it. Picasso was unequivocally a genius, and
he started very early in his work. If one visits the Barcelona Picasso Museum you’ll see very early works by him as a child that are astonishing. Picasso’s father was an art teacher, and he recognized his son’s genius at a very early age. Artistic prodigies are rare. In music they’re more common because music is very self-contained, but art is very ephemeral, art is very elusive from that standpoint. So, visual prodigies—artistic visual prodigies—are extraordinarily rare, and Picasso certainly comes to mind as arguably the greatest of all time. Picasso also worked in just about any medium you can imagine. Of course he worked in painting and sculpture and ceramic and drawing and watercolor and pastel and monotype, etching, lithography, it just goes on and on. Between 1958 and 1963, Picasso revolutionized printmaking through the medium of the linocut in which he carved away the negative
spaces of the linoleum to create these groundbreaking graphic masterpieces In terms of his ceramics, he conceived of
an idea of making editions of ceramics, taking ceramics, creating an image and
then making multiple examples of the same image, working with the most famous Atelier in the South of France and Vallauris at the time, the Remie Foundry, and Picasso produced 633 individual editions of ceramics in the beginning in 1947 to the end of his life. During the 1920s and ’30s, Picasso entered his Neoclassic Period in which he focused on the purity of form and created entire visual mythologies many of these based on his personal life at the time. Regardless of the medium in which he
worked, the name Picasso is synonymous with power, imagination, and virtuosity. It’s very hard to imagine another artist ever again in human history being as influential, magical or powerful as the great Pablo Picasso.

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